Down regulation of cotton GbTRP1 leads to accumulation of anthranilates and confers resistance to Verticillium dahliae

Journal of Cotton Research

[Background] Verticillium wilt, caused by Verticillium dahliae, is called a “cancer” disease of cotton. The discovery and identification of defense-related genes is essential for the breeding of Verticillium wilt-resistant varieties. In previous research we identified some possible broad-spectrum resistance genes. Here, we report a tryptophan synthesis-related gene GbTRP1 and its functional analysis in relation to the resistance of cotton to V. dahliae.

[Results] Expression analysis shows that GbTRP1 is suppressed at 1 h and 6 h post V. dahliae infection, but activated at 12 h and 24 h, and the expression of GbTRP1 is highly induced by treatment with salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Sub-cellular localization studies show that GbTRP1 is localized in the chloroplast. Suppression of GbTRP1 expression leads to lesion-mimic phenotypes and activates the immune response in cotton by showing enhanced resistance to V. dahliae and B. cinerea. Metabolomic analysis shows that anthranilic compounds significantly accumulated in GbTRP1-silenced plants, and these metabolites can inhibit the growth of V. dahliae and B. cinerea in vitro.

[Conclusions] Our results show that suppression of GbTRP1 expression dramatically activates the immune response and increases resistance of cotton to V. dahliae and B. cinerea, possibly due to the accumulation of anthranilate compounds. This study not only provides genetic resources for disease resistance breeding, but also may provide a basis for new chemical control methods for combatting of fungal disease in cotton.

[Title] Down regulation of cotton GbTRP1 leads to accumulation of anthranilates and confers resistance to Verticillium dahliae

[Authors] MIAO Yuhuan, ZHU Longfu and ZHANG Xianlong

Journal of Cotton Research. 2019; 2:19

https://doi.org/10.1186/s42397-019-0034-1

https://jcottonres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s42397-019-0034-1

Identification and Functional Analysis of Betv1 in Three D Genome-containing Wild Cotton Varieties

Abstract:

[Objective] By analyzing the major birch pollen allergen Betv1 gene family in D genomes of cotton and comparing the expression patterns of three diploid D-genome cotton varieties with different Verticillium wilt resistance levels, we aimed to provide a theoretical basis for further studies on the role of Betv1 genes in cotton resistant to Verticillium wilt. [Method] The Betv1 genes were identified, and a bioinformatics analysis of the physicochemical properties of their encoded sequences in Gossypium raimondii (D5) was performed. The transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time-PCR of G. raimondii (D5), Gossypium trilobum (D8) and Gossypium thurberi (D1) were used to verify the expression patterns of Bet v 1 genes under Verticillium dahlia infection stress. Betv1 genes were silenced by virus-induced gene silencing in G. hirsutum to identify their functions. [Result] The D genome of cotton contains 59 members, 58 of which have introns and are distributed on eight chromosomes, and most encode hydrophilic proteins that localize to the cytoplasm. The expression levels of Betv1 genes in three wild cotton species having D genomes after being inoculated with V. dahliae were consistent with their disease resistance levels. The genes were separated into three groups based on their expression levels. Genes of Group 3 responded to V. dahliae infection and were highly expressed in disease-resistant cotton species G. thurberi. This indicated that Group 3 genes may be involved in the immune response of Verticillium wilt. A gene with a high expression level was screened out of Group 3. A corresponding homologous gene was silenced in G. hirsutum by virus-induced gene silencing, and gene-silenced plants were more susceptible to V. dahliae, indicating that the gene plays a positive regulatory role in the progress of Verticillium wilt resistance in cotton. [Conclusion] The Betv1 genes act in response to V. dahliae infection and are critical in cotton resistance to Verticillium wilt. The information obtained provides a basis for further studies of the cotton Bet v 1 family genes and their functions.

Key words: wild cotton; Verticillium wilt; Betv1 gene; transcriptome; quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR); virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)

Cotton Science. 2019, 31(5):361-380.

https://doi.org/10.11963/1002-7807.dqmzy.20190723

Use of genetic and genomic approaches for combating cotton leaf curl disease

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Authors

Rahman, Mehboob-ur-1; Ali, Ahmed1; Qaiser khan, Ali1; Abbas, Ammad1; Rahmat, Zainab1; Sarfraz, Zareen1; Khalid, Anum1; Gul, Maryam1; Munir, Atif1; Atifiqbal, Muhammad1; Scheffler, Jodi2; Scheffler, Brain2;

1National Institute for Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering (NIBGE) Faisalabad, Pakistan. 2Jamie Whitten Delta States Research Center, Stoneville, Mississippi, USA

Abstract

Cotton leaf curl, a disease of viral origin, is transmitted by a whitefly (Bemisiatabaci), was first reported in 1912 in Nigeria, and later spread to Egypt, Sudan, India and Pakistan, and recently in China. The disease has significantly challenged the sustainability of cotton production in Pakistan with annual yield penalty of two million bales. Efforts were made in developing resistant cotton varieties, which upheld the resistance for couple of years but overcame by the evolution of new strain of the virus (now called as cotton leaf curl Burewala virus). For protecting the most important natural fiber producing crop, a mega project aiming at the improvement of genetics of the cotton plant for combating the disease, was initiated in 2011 under Pak-US (managed through ICARDA, Pakistan) joint venture program. Till now, more than 3500 cotton accessions have been screened; and 33 accessions were found asymptomatic while G. hirsutum 2472-3 and G. hirsutum 3661 showed high tolerance to the disease. Among the asymptomatic, G. hirsutum Mac-07 (photoperiod insensitive) is being used extensively by multiple cotton research institutes for developing resistant cotton cultivars. A number of mapping populations by involving tolerant and resistant cotton genotypes with the mostsusceptible cotton species were developed. For example, mapping populations were developed by crossingG. hirsutum 2472-3 (tolerant), G. hirsutum Mac-07 (resistant) and highly sensitive genotypes G. barbadense PGMB-66, G. barbadense PIMA S7, respectively. A total of 1200 SSRs were surveyed on parent genotypes of G. hirsutum 2472-3 and G. barbadense PGMB-66 (Cross-I). Out of these, 113 were found polymorphic. These were surveyed on F2population. In second population (derived from a cross G. hir 2472-3/G. bar PIMA S-7, Cross-II), we surveyed 170 SSRs. Out of these, 24 polymorphic were surveyed on F2population. Similarly, we too surveyed 435 SSRs on the parent genotypes of third mapping population (Mac-7/PIMA S-7, Cross-III). A total of 18 polymorphic primers were surveyed on F2 population. Based on our limited studies, we were able to identify two QTLs i.e. QCLCuD25 and QCLCuD26 from Cross-I population study, six QTLs i.e. QCLCuD3, QCLCuD4, QCLCuD7, QCLCuD8, QCLCuD9, QCLCuD14 from Cross-II population study, and three QTLs from cross-III population. These studies will pave the way for not only initiating marker-assisted breeding for the development of resistant cotton cultivars in Pakistan but will also provide a comprehensive information to the international cotton community for combating the disease.

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Effect of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) on Verticillium Wilt of Cotton

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Authors

Hamdullah Korhan1, Lale Efe2, Yuksel Bolek3 and Mustafa Kusek4

1Kahramanmaras Sutcu ımam university, graduate school of natural and applied sciences, Kahramanmaras, Turkey

2Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of

Field Crops, Kahramanmaras, Turkey,

3Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Kahramanmaras, Turkey

4Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Faculty of Agriculture, Department of

Plant Protection, Kahramanmaras, Turkey

Abstract

Verticillium wilt of cotton is a destructive disease that causes considerable yield losses on the crop. There is no effective method for controlling Verticillium wilt of cotton that is one of the world’s most devastating diseases except breeding resistant varieties. Due to environmental concerns of chemicals used in the control of this disease in which using antagonistic bacteria as a biocontrol agent to suppress the disease is very important. In addition, bacteria converting phosphorus to a form that is useful for the plant can offer an advantage for plant growth and disease resistance. Isolation the bacteria from the soil and use as plant growth regulation are the focus of some research has been going on.

Starting by 2014, this study will continue for 3 years. Starting, soil samples were collected at different vegetative periods of plant from 25 different cotton producing areas (from July to September) and pure strain cultivars were obtained from 650 soil samples. Tests applied to these strains are Hypersensitive Reaction on Tobacco, Levan Formation, Oxidase, Hydrogen Peroxide And Potassium Hydroxide. Resulting of identification tests, isolates that doesn’t have pathogenicity were tested for the ability to convert the phosphorus obtainable for by the plants, resulting of identification tests, isolates that doesn’t have pathogenicity will be used to antimicrobial activity in both greenhouse and in the field trials.

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Leaf reddening index as an indicator of leaf reddening malady in bt cotton hybrids: causes and remedies

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Authors

Y. Rakshitha1, B. S. Janagoudar* and A. Amaregouda2

1 Postgraduate scholar, 2 Professor of Crop Physiology

*        Correspondence : Dr. B. S. Janagoudar, Dean (Agri), College of Agriculture,

University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad – 580 005, Karnataka, India e-mail : bjanagoudar56@gmail.com, deanacd@uasd.in

Abstract

In the recent past, leaf reddening has been a major problem in Bt-cotton and this is an outcome of interaction of location, variety, environmental condition and nutrients. In general, inter and intra specific tetraploid Bt hybrids are more sensitive and vulnerable to this malady may be because of Bt gene interaction. Leaf reddening may occur at any growth stage of the crop. At grand growth  phase (flowering and boll development) any hindrance in the assimilate production, translocation and distribution intensifies the leaf reddening effect and symptoms are prolific in nature under extreme stress situations (Poongothai et  al., 2010).

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JCR-Physiology and Pathology Thematic Series Call For Paper

Coordinator:
Professor Hezhong DONG, Cotton Research Centre, Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China;
Professor Zhiguo ZHOU, Nanjing Agricultural University, China

Journal of Cotton Research is hosting a thematic series on cotton physiology and pathology. The research community is encouraged to share original findings, methodology, results, databases, and/or software and opinions.

Scopes that may be covered in the submissions may include, but are not limited to the following:

1. growth and organ development;
2. plant and shoot architecture;
3. water, fertilizer, light, etc. use efficiency;
4. intelligent agriculture;
5. rhizosphere and other plant-environment interactions;
6. main disease and resistance.

Submission Deadline: 30 September 2019

Submit Now

https://jcottonres.biomedcentral.com/cottonpap

JCR-Cotton High Speed Phenotyping Thematic Series Call For Paper

Journal of Cotton Research

Cotton High Speed Phenotyping
Thematic Series Call For Paper
Coordinator: Professor Eric F. Hequet, Texas Tech University, USA; Dr. Glen Ritchie, Texas Tech University, USA

Author’s allowance: The sponsor, Institute of Cotton Research, CAAS, grants to cover not only APC for the submission, but also the author’s allowance once published.

High speed phenotyping is critical to improve cotton research and production. It can be applied to large scale commercial fields, research fields, breeding lines, and even at the individual plant level. The main goals are to improve yield, fiber quality, stress and disease resistance, etc… Recently, advances in high speed phenotyping in cotton have been achieved. The Journal of Cotton Research is hosting a thematic series on this topic. The research community is encouraged to share original findings, methodology, results, databases, and/or software and opinions.

Scopes that may be covered in the submissions may include, but are not limited to the following:
1. Platform design: air-based and/or land-based;
2. Data capture and processing: sensors (RGB, IR, multispectral, sonic, etc.), integration of multiple sensors, information processing technologies;
3. Data analysis and Metadata: analysis of very large data sets, validation with ground truth, practical application examples (breeding programs, site specific irrigation scheduling, etc.).

Submission Deadline: April 30, 2019

https://jcottonres.biomedcentral.com/cottonhsp

Seventh ‘Asian Cotton Research and Development Network’ Meeting, 15-17 Sept 2017, Nagpur India.

The Seventh Meeting of the Asian Cotton Research and Development Network was held at Nagpur during 15-17 September 2017. The Indian Society for Cotton Improvement (ISCI), Mumbai hosted the meeting together with the ICAR-CICR (Central Institute for Cotton Research), Nagpur and ICAR-CIRCOT (Central Institute for Research on Cotton Technologies). The main theme of the meeting was PRODUCING QUALITY FIBRE & DOUBLING COTTON FARMERS INCOME. Cotton researchers from public and the private sector participated. Dr. C. D. Mayee, President, Indian Society for Cotton Improvement, was the chairman, of the organizing Committee. The meeting elected Dr. Prashant G. Patil as Chairman of the Network until the next meeting. Eminent cotton experts i.e., Dr. Timorthy Dennehy, Dr Judith Brown, Dr Albert Santos from US; Dr Derek Russell from Australia, Dr Negm from Egypt and several senior research leaders from India and Bangladesh attended the meeting. The proceedings, recommendations, presentations and abstracts of the meeting can be accessed here.

Seventh Meeting of the ACRDN

Proceedings are available

The Seventh Meeting of the Asian Cotton Research and Development Network was held at Nagpur, India during 15-17 September 2017. The Indian Society for Cotton Improvement (ISCI), Mumbai hosted the meeting together with the ICAR-CICR (Central Institute for Cotton Research), Nagpur and ICAR-CIRCOT (Central Institute for Research on Cotton Technologies).

The main theme of the meeting was  “PRODUCING QUALITY FIBRE & DOUBLING COTTON FARMERS INCOME.” Cotton researchers from public and the private sector participated. Dr. C.D. Mayee, President, Indian Society for Cotton Improvement, was the Chairman of the Organizing Committee. The meeting elected Dr. Prashant G. Patil as Chairman of the Network until the next meeting. Eminent cotton experts like Dr. Timorthy Dennehy, Dr Judith Brown, Dr Albert Santos from US; Dr Derek Russell from Australia; Dr Negm from Egypt and several senior research leaders from India and Bangladesh attended the meeting.

The proceedings, recommendations, presentations and abstracts of the meeting are now available at the ICAC website.