Cotton ginning technologies – selection criteria for optimum results

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Author

M.K. Sharma

President, Bajaj Steel Industries Ltd., Nagpur India

Abstract

Ginning is the mechanical process for separating cotton into its constituents namely lint (Cotton Fibre) and Cotton Seed. The Seed Cotton that comes from the field has to be subjected to various treatments in the ginning factories depending upon its inherent characteristics such as trash contents, moisture contents, length of the fibre, variety of seed i.e. fuzzy or black, method of seed cotton transportation, storage practices, handling practices inside the ginning factories and finally subjected to ginning process for separation of fibre and seed before packing into bales etc. Ideally the quality of the constituents i.e. cotton fibre and cotton seed before ginning and after ginning must be more or less same however it is

seen that substantial damage is caused to quality parameters during processes in the ginning factories. The selection of cotton for spinning is made on the basis of fibre quality and any damage in the same during the process of ginning reduces the value of the fibre and results in lowering down of value in total textile value chain.

The development of high speed spinning and weaving machinery has necessitated requirement of better cotton fibre parameters and any damage in quality caused while ginning cannot be rectified later and the defect is carried forward to yarn and fabrics during spinning and weaving process.

The economics of ginning operation is greatly affected by the damage in the quality of the constituents i.e. cotton fibre and cotton seed and lower realization due to same affects down the line to the farmer / grower as the pressure of the lower realization by ginners results in lower price for seed cotton being paid to him.

The economics of ginning operation depends upon the proper selection of ginning technology suitable for various characteristics of the seed cotton to optimize the quality parameters and operational costs, thus the selection of suitable ginning technology is of paramount importance.

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Advances in cotton ginning technology in India

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Author

M.K. Sharma

President, Bajaj Steel Industries Ltd., Nagpur India

Abstract

The introduction of TMC and TUF by Govt. of India from year 2000 made great impact on modernization of ginning sector in India and even after completion of TMC in year 2010 it has created a trend of automated and modernized ginning factories in India hence majority of new ginning factories being established even after year 2010 in India are following the guidelines of TMC. This has resulted in significant reduction of trash and contamination in Indian cotton. The Indian cotton has got wide acceptance across the globe on quality parameters and India has achieved the status of second largest exporter of cotton in the world.

The journey of modernization of various operations in a ginning

& pressing factory is being continued to further improve the quality and cost efficiency as well as ease of operations for ginning & pressing factories and many advances have taken place in the past few years to improve the processing of this unique crop, each component of which is having multiple uses similar to items like coconut where each component adds to value. Continued journey of advances is day by day improving the areas remaining to be addressed for the cotton processing sector in most beneficial manner.

The Goals:

The full potential of the cotton crop by optimizing the processing parameters and to make its fullest and best use will be achieved only when following goals are achieved:

  1. The cotton fibre will be ginned in a  way  that  it  retains best natural fibre parameters e. maximum length,  natural  luster, and other natural parameters as they are available on the cotton boll when it is grown on plant in the field.
  2. To fully utilize the various components of seed cotton e. cotton lint, cotton seed, hull, kernel, and oil.

To fully utilize the cotton stalk etc. to make various items such as wood pallets, particle boards, biogas, energy generation & compost making.

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Seventh ‘Asian Cotton Research and Development Network’ Meeting, 15-17 Sept 2017, Nagpur India.

The Seventh Meeting of the Asian Cotton Research and Development Network was held at Nagpur during 15-17 September 2017. The Indian Society for Cotton Improvement (ISCI), Mumbai hosted the meeting together with the ICAR-CICR (Central Institute for Cotton Research), Nagpur and ICAR-CIRCOT (Central Institute for Research on Cotton Technologies). The main theme of the meeting was PRODUCING QUALITY FIBRE & DOUBLING COTTON FARMERS INCOME. Cotton researchers from public and the private sector participated. Dr. C. D. Mayee, President, Indian Society for Cotton Improvement, was the chairman, of the organizing Committee. The meeting elected Dr. Prashant G. Patil as Chairman of the Network until the next meeting. Eminent cotton experts i.e., Dr. Timorthy Dennehy, Dr Judith Brown, Dr Albert Santos from US; Dr Derek Russell from Australia, Dr Negm from Egypt and several senior research leaders from India and Bangladesh attended the meeting. The proceedings, recommendations, presentations and abstracts of the meeting can be accessed here.

Seventh Meeting of the ACRDN

Proceedings are available

The Seventh Meeting of the Asian Cotton Research and Development Network was held at Nagpur, India during 15-17 September 2017. The Indian Society for Cotton Improvement (ISCI), Mumbai hosted the meeting together with the ICAR-CICR (Central Institute for Cotton Research), Nagpur and ICAR-CIRCOT (Central Institute for Research on Cotton Technologies).

The main theme of the meeting was  “PRODUCING QUALITY FIBRE & DOUBLING COTTON FARMERS INCOME.” Cotton researchers from public and the private sector participated. Dr. C.D. Mayee, President, Indian Society for Cotton Improvement, was the Chairman of the Organizing Committee. The meeting elected Dr. Prashant G. Patil as Chairman of the Network until the next meeting. Eminent cotton experts like Dr. Timorthy Dennehy, Dr Judith Brown, Dr Albert Santos from US; Dr Derek Russell from Australia; Dr Negm from Egypt and several senior research leaders from India and Bangladesh attended the meeting.

The proceedings, recommendations, presentations and abstracts of the meeting are now available at the ICAC website.