History under writing

The content of this post is a replication of a message I have just sent. You can react to my message by commenting this post.

This is to attract your attention to the fact that some of you have taken over the challenge of embarking to write of the history of cotton research. Click on wiki after logging in and discover what has been started for the State of Gujarat, as a chapter of the history of cotton research in India. This chapter will be enriched as additional materials are provided.

The supply of some materials related to the cotton history in Sudan gave me the idea of starting a book dedicated to the tools, implements and devices in cotton production. I believe that many research teams have carried out specific tools for the implementation of their experiments and they could be useful to research fellows in other countries if not to cotton growers producing on small scale. I hope that many of you could contribute to this book.

I do hope that we could actually achieve  a collaborative approach in writing our Gossybooks in our Gossypedia. This means that every one could free to contribute to books under process.

The Gossypedia functionality of our website is well adapted to the collaborative process in the sense that books, chapters or pages are “viewable” by ICRA members only when we decide to. This means that, as long as the writing of a page is not over, it can remain hidden and only viewable to and editable by those endowed with the relevant rights.

Even when some of you volunteer for a book or a chapter, they have been reluctant so far to take command of the Gossypedia tool and play the editor’s role. By default, I am playing this role.Although I understand the hesitation to invest in mastering a web tool, the current way is not sustainable as I should be quitting my position soon.

 

A genome-wide identification of the BLH gene family reveals BLH1 involved in cotton fiber development

[Background] Cotton is the world’s largest and most important source of renewable natural fiber. BEL1-like homeodomain (BLH) genes are ubiquitous in plants and have been reported to contribute to plant development. However, there is no comprehensive characterization of this gene family in cotton. In this study, 32, 16, and 18 BLH genes were identified from the G. hirsutumG. arboreum, and G. raimondii genome, respectively. In addition, we also studied the phylogenetic relationships, chromosomal location, gene structure, and gene expression patterns of the BLH genes.

[Result] The results indicated that these BLH proteins were divided into seven distinct groups by phylogenetic analysis. Among them, 25 members were assigned to 15 chromosomes. Furthermore, gene structure, chromosomal location, conserved motifs, and expression level of BLH genes were investigated in G. hirsutum. Expression profiles analysis showed that four genes (GhBLH1_3GhBLH1_4GhBLH1_5, and GhBLH1_6) from BLH1 subfamily were highly expressed during the fiber cell elongation period. The expression levels of these genes were significantly induced by gibberellic acid and brassinosteroid, but not auxin. Exogenous application of gibberellic acid significantly enhanced GhBLH1_3GhBLH1_4, and GhBLH1_5transcripts. Expression levels of GhBLH1_3 and GhBLH1_4 genes were significantly increased under brassinosteroid treatment.

[Conclusion] The BLH gene family plays a very important role in many biological processes during plant growth and development. This study deepens our understanding of the role of the GhBLH1gene involved in fiber development and will help us in breeding better cotton varieties in the future.

[Title] A genome-wide identification of the BLH gene family reveals BLH1 involved in cotton fiber development

[Authors] LIU Cuixia, LI Zhifang, DOU Lingling, Yi YUAN, ZOU Changsong, SHANG Haihong, CUI Langjun & XIAO  Guanghui

Journal of Cotton Research 2020, 326

https://doi.org/10.1186/s42397-020-00068-y

Cotton research history?

World Cotton Day

As we have been recently recalled, ICAC has launched the initiative of declaring October 7 as the World Cotton Day. Hopefully, in a couple of days, it will become the new UN World Cotton Day and give us some pride in working on cotton.

For sure, the World Cotton Day will be celebrated at various cotton research organizations all over the world, along celebrations initiated by other stakeholders of the cotton industry.

World Cotton Research History?

I nevertheless wonder how we, cotton scientists or professionals, could more specifically celebrate cotton.

I believe that many of you would concur with me that research has contribute a lot to what cotton industry has become in all producing countries. However, is there any track of that? Has the history of cotton research ever been written and updated anywhere? Would it be relevant to initiate the writing of such histories in producing countries so as to compose the World History of Cotton Research?

Answers and challenges are yours! And quite difficult.

More modestly and realistically, would you have ideas of particular research outputs, maybe associated to particular researchers, that you think have been crucial breakthroughs in the development of the cotton industry in your country?

 

Global identification of genes associated with xylan biosynthesis in cotton fiber

[Background] Mature cotton fiber secondary cell wall comprises largely of cellulose (> 90%) and small amounts of xylan and lignin. Little is known about the cotton fiber xylan biosynthesis by far.

[Result] To comprehensively survey xylan biosynthetic genes in cotton fiber, we identified five IRX9, five IRX10, one IRX14, six IRX15, two FRA8, one PARVUS, eight GUX, four GXM, two RWA, two AXY9, 13 TBL genes by using phylogenetic analysis coupled with expression profile analysis and co-expression analyses. In addition, we also identified two GT61 members, two GT47 members, and two DUF579 family members whose homologs in Arabidopsis were not functionally characterized. These 55 genes were regarded as the most probable genes to be involved in fiber xylan biosynthesis. Further complementation analysis indicated that one IRX10 like and two FRA8 related genes were able to partially recover the irregular xylem phenotype conferred by the xylan deficiency in their respective Arabidopsis mutant. We conclude that these genes are functional orthologs of respective genes that are implicated in GX biosynthesis.

[Conclusion] The list of 55 cotton genes presented here provides not only a solid basis to uncover the biosynthesis of xylan in cotton fiber, but also a genetic resource potentially useful for future studies aiming at fiber improvement via biotechnological approaches.

[Title] Global identification of genes associated with xylan biosynthesis in cotton fiber

[Authors] CHEN Feng, GUO Yanjun, CHEN Li, GAN Xinli, LIU Min, LI Juan & XU Wenliang

Journal of Cotton Research 2020, 325

https://doi.org/10.1186/s42397-020-00063-3

Development and application of perfect SSR markers in cotton

[Background] This study aimed to develop a set of perfect simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with a single copy in the cotton genome, to construct a DNA fingerprint database suitable for authentication of cotton cultivars. We optimized the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system for multi-platform compatibility and improving detection efficiency. Based on the reference genome of upland cotton and 10× resequencing data of 48 basic cotton germplasm lines, single-copy polymorphic SSR sites were identified and developed as diploidization SSR markers. The SSR markers were detected by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) for initial screening, then fluorescence capillary electrophoresis for secondary screening. The final perfect SSR markers were evaluated and verified using 210 lines from different sources among Chinese cotton regional trials.

[Result] Using bioinformatics techniques, 1 246 SSR markers were designed from 26 626 single-copy SSR loci. Adopting a stepwise (primary and secondary) screening strategy, a set of 60 perfect SSR markers was selected with high amplification efficiency and stability, easy interpretation of peak type, multiple allelic variations, high polymorphism information content (PIC) value, uniform chromosome distribution, and single-copy characteristics. A multiplex PCR system was established with ten SSR markers using capillary electrophoresis detection.

[Conclusion] A set of perfect SSR markers of cotton was developed and a high-throughput SSR marker detection system was established. This study lays a foundation for large-scale and standardized construction of a cotton DNA fingerprint database for authentication of cotton varieties.

[Title] Development and application of perfect SSR markers in cotton

[Authors] WU Yuzhen, HUANG Longyu, ZHOU Dayun, FU Xiaoqiong, LI Chao, WEI Shoujun, PENG Jun & KUANG Meng

Journal of Cotton Research 2020, 321

https://doi.org/10.1186/s42397-020-00066-0